I recently went to South Africa over the Christmas break. Upon my return, I was instructed to get a Covid test because of the destination I had been to. I was fine with it, it is what it is. Mind you I had already tested prior to leaving, I would rather not make people feel uncomfortable around me because I didn't test. So I took one and...it was negative.

I remember taking a test before and it took maybe an hour to get my results. The test I took after returning from my vacation took over 48 hours to get the results. I thought "maybe because it is the end of a holiday". I thought, lots of people are returning to town and seeking to take a test.

Photo by Mufid Majnun on Unsplash
Photo by Mufid Majnun on Unsplash
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Then a few days ago, I was in close contact with a client that tested positive. Being the responsible adult and respecting the people around me, I went to get another test.

I called to schedule an appointment with urgent care and the sweet woman said, "you can go to the hospital and do drive through, where there is a long wait, you can go to urgent care, where there is a long wait, or you can go to the Belgrade urgent care where...you guessed it, there is a long wait."

I thought, dang this is an all day thing. The lady actually said to grab something to drink and snacks because you are going to be waiting 2-3 hours most likely. She wasn't wrong and I definitely appreciated here honesty!

Photo by Perfect Snacks on Unsplash
Photo by Perfect Snacks on Unsplash
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The wait or my results again, was over 48 hours. I thought this is crazy! I know that there is a surge in positive cases around the entire United States, but it seems like everyone sends the tests off now, instead of getting results on location.

I feel bad for all of our testers, the long lines, the long waits, people complaining, bless their hearts for working through this crazy time we are all living in. I chose not to get an "at home test" because not knowing if I was positive or not, I didn't think it was right to walk through stores looking for one.

The moral of the story, if you are thinking about getting a test, schedule it now so you don't have to wait in line for a couple of hours. BUT if you do have to wait in line, grab those snacks and drinks!

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.